Conference Agenda 2022:

E-Fuels & Hydrogen Propulsion

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Conference pass gives you access to all 5 conference tracks, the exhibition hall, and all post-event proceedings

E-Fuels & Hydrogen Propulsion

Day1: October 19, 2022

Powering a Climate-Neutral Future
9:00 am - 12:10 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Powering a Climate-Neutral Future
Denis Thomas
Global Business Development Leader - Electrolyzers
Cummins Inc
The transportation sector currently produces roughly 20% of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and, based on current policies, it is estimated that emissions from transportation will rise by 60% between 2015 and 2050 globally. So, finding more sustainable sources of energy for the transportation sector is paramount in combatting global warming. This calls for further investment in efuels as the demand and supply is created.
 

9:25 am (CET)

Overview of Political Strategies and Funding Possibilities within E-Fuels
Johannes Daum
Head of Division Hydrogen, Alternative Fuels and Fuel Cells
NOW GmbH
Renewable fuels are one important technology to reach the climate protection targets in the transport sector. They are needed in addition to a broad uptake of electric batteries and hydrogen/fuel cell mobility. Therefore the German government supports renewable fuels with a toolset of different strategies and measures. E-Fuels are for example one important element in the German Hydrogen Strategy. Implementing measures for E-Fuels include funding for R&D, investment support as well as a regulatory framework to ramp up the use of E-Fuels.
 

9:50 am (CET)

Hydrogen-Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) in Europe
Bernd Friedrichs
Engineer- Test and Automation
Hyundai Motor Europe Technical Center
The presentation would consist of an introduction in our hydrogen development topics, a comparison between Fuel Cell and H2-ICE applications and some more detailed results from prior H2-ICE investigations.
 
Coffee Break -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

The Need for Green Hydrogen for the Scale-Up of Sustainable Aviation Fuels
Misha Valk
Head of Capacity Development Europe
SkyNRG
The session will highlight sustainable aviation fuel market outlook and role of PtL fuel and address the challenges of developing green H2 capacity in the context of SAF production. Followed by the potential solutions and stakeholders needed to overcome these challenges, including governments.
 

11:10 am (CET)

Regulatory Framework and Market Design in the EU: How to create a Target Market for eFuels ?
Ralf Diemer
Managing Director
eFuels Alliance
In a CO2-neutral future, eFuels will be needed in many areas, such as transport and off-road, energy supply and industry. The technology to produce eFuels is ready and can be supplied by many companies all over the world but also in the EU. Major challenges are ahead: How can we trigger the uptake of industrialized production of eFuels? How can we shape a market design in the EU? What should a proper regulatory framework look like? This presentation wants to give some insights to these major challenges.
 

11:30 am (CET)

Panel Discussion: The Future of Hydrogen and E-Fuels
Ralf Diemer
Managing Director
eFuels Alliance
Johannes Daum
Head of Division Hydrogen, Alternative Fuels and Fuel Cells
NOW GmbH
Denis Thomas
Global Business Development Leader - Electrolyzers
Cummins Inc
Based on plans for a carbon-neutral economy in 2050, this session will highlight a holistic framework to assess the real potential of e-fuels, its future and stakeholder engagement necessary to continue momentum and accelerate growth an investment.
 
Lunch Break -
12:10 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
Hydrogen-Based Propulsion Systems
1:30 pm - 5:10 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

Green Hydrogen for Mobility - H2 Infrastructure Rethought
Jens Conrad
Business Development Manager Deutschland
Everfuel
Everfuel offers green hydrogen (H2) for emission-free mobility at economic conditions throughout Europe. The company is headquartered in Herning, Denmark. In the core markets, including Germany, separate companies have been founded. One of these is Everfuel GmbH, a wholly owned subsidiary based in Cologne. By serving the entire H2-value chain which includes both the supply of green hydrogen and the construction and operation of the filling station infrastructure where competitive prices are possible. Offering a complete solution for customers, lowers the entry hurdle for fleet operators significantly. In our module, they only pay for the hydrogen dispensed and can continue to focus fully on their core business. Issues such as the approval process, planning and construction of the H2 filling station are handled by Everfuel in consultation with the public transport company. The same applies to the operation of the station, including maintenance and delivery of green hydrogen. Due to a holistic view of the hydrogen economy - from production to the delivery of hydrogen at the filling station - there are, among other things, economic advantages. This allows Everfuel to offer potential customers a permanent transition to a zero-emission, one-to-one conversion of fleets and industrial plants currently powered by fossil fuels at competitive operating costs. In our view, this approach offers many advantages for public transport customers, among others. From our experience and many discussions with public transport and logistic companies, we have repeatedly noticed that the H2 infrastructure in particular represents a high barrier to entry. This we need to tackle jointly with consumers. Among other things Everfuel is also currently developing a mobile/flexible H2 refuelling station solution for fleet operators who initially want to start with a few vehicles or demonstration projects. This solution is also designed to facilitate the entry into hydrogen mobility.

1:55 pm (CET)

The Sustainable Future of Hydrogen in Aviation: From Drones to Large Passenger Aircraft
Roel van Benthem
Lead R&D Engineer Hydrogen Systems
Royal Netherlands Aerospace Centre
An overview of the developments at NLR (Royal Netherlands Aerospace Centre) in the Netherlands is given about the progress made within the hydrogen research program. The feasibility of having high pressure hydrogen (GH2) on board of a fuel cell powered drone is demonstrated with the HYDRA 1 &2 drones. The liquid hydrogen infrastructure at NLR is ready to support a planned first demonstration flight on LH2 end-off 2022.

2:20 pm (CET)

Hydrogen from Propeller to Propeller: Creating the Right Framework for Hydrogen Application in Maritime Sector
Helmut Behrens
Director of Sales
Siemens Energy
Siemens_Energy_logo
Hydrogen from Propeller the Propeller covers Siemens Energy’s complete story line from wind generation – hydrogen production – re-electrification – electric distribution on ships for propulsion.
Coffee Break -
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm (CET)
 

3:15 pm (CET)

Hydrogen Ready Gas Engines with MW Size
Klaus Payrhuber
Strategic Product Development Manager
Innio Jenbacher
This presentation focuses on hydrogen readiness of distributed power and CHP solutions. in order to avoid carbon lock-in investments, gas power plants, if large or small in power output, should be ready for conversion to renewable fuels such as hydrogen when becoming available. Distributed power solutions are installed at sites where both power and heat are used and therefore achieve very high fuel utilization rates of 90% and more. Combined with heat storages and back-up boilers, distributed CHP solutions can operate very flexible and run only when not enough renewable electricity supply is available. INNIO has demonstrated the conversion of a 1 MW CHP plant from natural gas to hydrogen operation with plant operator HanseWerk Natur in Germany. Achievements such as output, efficiency and emissions when operating on hydrogen fuel will be discussed. INNIO has developed a hydrogen readiness concept that is applicable for all distributed power and CHP plants. While some engines are already available to run on 100% hydrogen fuel, others will follow the next couple years. Another hydrogen CHP example from South Korea will be presented as well.

3:40 pm (CET)

A Novel Multi-Mode Combustion Strategy for Hydrogen Engines
D. Ryan Williams
Manager – SI Engine R&D
SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Combustion of hydrogen in an internal combustion engine is a pathway to near-zero tailpipe greenhouse gas emissions. The automotive industry is rapidly shifting towards a fully electric future, especially for smaller vehicles. However, a gap remains for larger vehicles where batteries would be too large, too expensive, and take too long to charge for some commercial applications. Low carbon fuels are seen as a potential solution for larger vehicle classes, and hydrogen is the ultimate low carbon fuel when considering just the tailpipe. Hydrogen is a unique fuel, it has several properties which make it an excellent choice of fuel for an IC engine. However, it also has several properties which lead to challenges with IC engine combustion.

4:05 pm (CET)

Preliminary Design of Fuel Cell Powered Propulsion Units for Modern Regional Aircraft
Thimo Bielsky
Research Associate, Institute of Aircraft Systems Engineering
Hamburg University of Technology
An important aspect of overall systems design is to conduct concept studies in which a suitable systems architecture is to be determined based on the top-level aircraft requirements (TLAR). This includes the evaluation of several architecture concepts based on relevant key performance indicators, for example energy consumption, mass, cost, and ecological balance. For this purpose, the GeneSys software framework is being developed at the Institute of Aircraft Systems Engineering (Hamburg University of Technology), which can be used to perform the overall systems design for conventional aircraft as well as for modern, hydrogen-powered concept aircraft. The scope of current research projects includes the preliminary design of fuel cells and their peripheral systems (e.g. air supply, hydrogen supply, thermal management) for both electric propulsion and aircraft on-board systems power supply concepts. A concept for a hydrogen-based regional aircraft, which is powered by fuel cells, has been derived based on existing aircraft models. This hydrogen-based concept aircraft has ten propulsion units in total. Each unit contains a hybrid fuel cell system, the peripherals, an electric motor, and a propeller. The GeneSys software framework is used to define and design different systems architectures for the aircraft. Here, the focus lies on power supply strategies for the aircraft on-board systems. The presentation will briefly introduce the GeneSys framework for overall systems design. Moreover, the preliminary design of the mentioned propulsion units is presented. This includes important findings, such as sensitivities of system parameters, which may arise due to different power supply concepts. Finally, the complexity during the conceptual design phase due to the high number of interfaces and dependencies between the systems are shown.

4:30 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Unlocking Opportunities in Hydrogen-Based Propulsion Systems
Helmut Behrens
Director of Sales
Siemens Energy
Siemens_Energy_logo
Roel van Benthem
Lead R&D Engineer Hydrogen Systems
Royal Netherlands Aerospace Centre
Misha Valk
Head of Capacity Development Europe
SkyNRG
David Thackray
Marketing Director
Tevva Electric & Hydrogen Trucks
Tevva logo
Achieving the long-term climate goals requires vehicle propulsion systems in all sectors with a CO2 and emissions footprint close to ZERO. Hydrogen as energy carrier and the corresponding fuel cell propulsion are a promising cornerstone for future ground transportation as well as for the aviation industry. Fuel cell propulsion systems introduce hybrid topologies with very complex operating strategies and many components interacting with each other.

Day2: October 20, 2022

Deployment of E-Fuels on a Commercial Scale
9:00 am - 12:10 pm (CET)

9:00 am (CET)

Blended Technology Approach To Zero Emission HGV’s (Hydrogen & Electric) To Achieve Lower Overall Total Cost Of Ownership & Bolster Overall Sustainability – an OEM perspective
David Thackray
Marketing Director
Tevva Electric & Hydrogen Trucks
Tevva logo
Hydrogen and/or electric? Why a blended approach makes sense? The Role of hydrogen fuel cells in optimising batteries TCO.
 

9:25 am (CET)

E-fuels Produced from Methanol – A German Technology Solution
Jörg Engelmann
CEO and Chairman
CAC Chemieanlagenbau Chemnitz GmbH
The main focus of this session will highlight CAC's proprietary technologies for the production of synthetic fuels (gasoline and kerosene) derived from (e-)methanol. The start of development of the Methanol-To-Fuel technology goes back to the year 2008 and led to a market-ready state to produce synthetic gasoline in industrial-scale plants. A brief overview on the history, the process scheme, the gasoline properties and practical applications will be presented. In addition, CAC will give impressions of their Methanol-To-Jet Fuel technology for the production of SAF and therefore the introduction of a new SAF production pathway.
 

9:50 am (CET)

Hydrogen Based Propulsion as Key Enabler in a Sustainable Climate-Neutral Aviation System
Ron van Manen
Head Of Strategic Development
Clean Aviation Joint Undertaking
The Clean Aviation programme has defined three major “thrusts” for its 4.1bn€ research programme: (hybrid-)electric regional aircraft, ultra-efficient short/medium range aircraft, and hydrogen-powered aircraft in order to make the required “skip a generation” shift in aircraft performance within the coming decade. Clean Aviation (a public private partnership under the European Union’s Horizon Europe flagship Research and Innovation Framework Programme) will develop and demonstrate aircraft technology that will enable net CO2 reductions of up to 90% compared to today’s state-of-the-art aircraft when combined with the effect of drop-in sustainable fuels [SAF], or “true zero” CO2 airborne emissions when using hydrogen as fuel.
 
Coffee Break -
10:15 am - 10:45 am (CET)
 

10:45 am (CET)

The Role of Students in the Aviation Energy Transition
Wouter van der Linden
Team Manager
AeroDelft
This session will provide an insight into how students currently experience as well as aspire to contribute to the energy transition in the aviation industry. Despite us lacking the years of experience and knowledge veterans in this field do have, we believe surprisingly many and valuable lessons can be learned from students, and that we can and should play a critical role in this energy transition.
 

11:10 am (CET)

Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engines - The Better Fuel Cell?
Rolf Schicke
Project Manager Hydrogen Systems
Eura AG
Hydrogen internal combustion engines (HYICEs) are very often considered as being only the second choice - behind fuel cells. However, there is a number of inherent advantages of hydrogen combustion engines compared to fuel cells: 1.) Combustion engines are much more robust than fuel cells. There is no need for extremely high purity (i.e. grade 5.0) of hydrogen as is the case with fuel cells which does require certain means for cleaning up - for instance hydrogen produced by electrolysis or delivered by pipeline. In addition, in harsh environments like in agriculture or construction works a hydrogen engine can tolerate dust and (in the case of a fuel cell: toxic) gaseous species without damage or weak performance whereas in the case of a fuel cell a number of substances (for instance sulphur or chlorine compounds) will lead to a (often irreversible) decrease of catalytic activity resulting in lower performance (and at the end in the need to replace the stack) 2.) The industry (carmakers, Tier one suppliers) for manufacturing combustion engines has been well established for decades. As a consequence, todays engines (produced in large quantities) are highly efficient and optimised devices. The overall system efficiency of a PEM fuel cell propulsion system and a hydrogen drive train are rather similar. 3.) Due to the manufacturing competencies for engines (optimised over decades) and also the type of (raw) materials needed the specific productions costs of an internal combustion engine (around some 50 € per kW) will remain far below the specific costs of a fuel cell traction system (today about a factor of (at least) 10 higher), not only regarding the next few years but for the mid-term future and very likely also beyond. Fuel cell developments over the past 25 years did not (so far) result in competitive manufacturing costs compared to combustion engines although the structure of a fuel cell system (even the core component, the stack) is much less complicated 4.) When running on "lean“ hydrogen / air mixtures (i.e. lambda > 2,5), hydrogen ICEs show still a good performance (i.e. reasonable specific power density) while NO_x emissions are very low. 5.) The introduction of hydrogen combustion engines into the market, particularly regarding heavy trucks, would reduce carbon dioxide emissions (from burning fossil fuels) presumably much faster than the relatively slow market entrance of fuel cell trucks (which, in addition, does require substantial amounts of subsidies to be accepted by fleet operators / logistic companies). There are other factors as well (for instance the large impact on work forces required for both technologies). These, together with examples of practical systems illustrating the characteristics / advantages / disadvantages of both drive train technologies, will be presented.
 

11:30 am (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: E-fuels Usability The Answer To Future Fuel Requirements
Dr. Markus Münz
VDMA Engines and Systems
VDMA
Dr. Lisa Belkhichane
A&D Industry Sustainability Value Expert
Dassault Systèmes
Gert Hartmans
Operations Research Consultant
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines,
Ron van Manen
Head Of Strategic Development
Clean Aviation Joint Undertaking
From nations, corporations, and energy and utility enterprises to start-ups, the industry has placed their bets on the e-fuels as the future energy carrier that will replace fossil energy. Based on plans for a carbon-neutral economy in 2050, the session will discuss e-fuels usability and assess the real potential of e-fuels and why they deserve greater attention.
 
Lunch Break -
12:10 pm - 1:30 pm (CET)
 
Opportunities and Synergies that E-Fuels Could Benefit From
1:30 pm - 4:45 pm (CET)

1:30 pm (CET)

New engine design for hydrogen in zero carbon aviation
Gert Hartmans
Operations Research Consultant
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines,
Hydrogen as sustainable e-fuel has unique properties providing both opportunities and constraints. 100 years of carbon combustion technology development is not the best starting point for future hydrogen usage in aviation. COMOAB has a new engine concept that builds on the opportunities provided by hydrogen and avoids the constraints hydrogen fuel usage poses to existing combustion engine technology. Zero carbon commercial aircraft propulsion solutions need to provide a long cruise range and high thrust at take-off at the lowest possible weight. A hybrid solution with a (small) battery electric propulsion with hydrogen combustion engine hybrid generating electricity fits these requirements. Avoiding the low efficiencies of jet and reciprocating engines, the COMOAB design provides a lower cost, lower weight design with a efficient conversion of hydrogen to torque.

1:55 pm (CET)

Hydrogen Powered Aviation Through Digitalization
Dr. Lisa Belkhichane
A&D Industry Sustainability Value Expert
Dassault Systèmes
Reducing climate change is a critical challenge worldwide. With the imperative to reduce carbon footprint, hydrogen propulsion has the potential to play a major part of the aviation decarbonization. One key component for realizing the potential of hydrogen is the collaboration through the digital continuity, from organizations to leaders and jurisdictions but also across all hydrogen programs. Using a single source of truth accelerates product delivery, enabling system integration among all program partners and suppliers. It also supports decision-makers and investors in deploying hydrogen at scale, by accelerating innovations, reducing costs and developing the workforce of tomorrow.

2:20 pm (CET)

Sodium Borohydrides as Sustainable, Circular Hydrogen Storage Material
Chris Slootweg
Associate Professor at the Van’t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences
University of Amsterdam
In this session we will elaborate on our recently developed circular, waste-free method to regenerate the solid hydrogen carrier NaBH4 through the electrochemical recycling of the NaBO2 spent fuel. This discovery lays the groundwork for the large-scale application of sodium borohydride as sustainable hydrogen storage medium, and thus opens up exciting opportunities for importing hydrogen an a large, commercial scale.
Coffee Break -
2:45 pm - 3:15 pm (CET)
 

3:15 pm (CET)

Tradability of Sustainable Aviation Fuels: the Role of Book and Claim
Matteo Micheli
Senior Expert - Hydrogen and Power-to-X
German Energy Agency - dena
Optimal production sites for sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) from green hydrogen are often far from points of consumption. SAF produced from green hydrogen is thus likely to be traded internationally. Both the private sector and policymakers have shown interest in a Book and Claim-based tracking model to allow for a faster, broader uptake of SAF in the energy system. What can be the role of Book and Claim?

3:40 pm (CET)

Hydrogen for the Energy Sector and Mobility
Matěj Jakubec
Sales Manager
DEVINN s.r.o.
This session shares insights from a hydrogen integrator perspective. Synergy of batteries with hydrogen and the use of hydrogen in heavy & duty industry.

4:05 pm (CET)

PANEL DISCUSSION: Scenario Analysis for E-Fuels in the Global Energy System
Dr. Markus Münz
VDMA Engines and Systems
VDMA
Dirk Ortlieb
Managing Director
Simerics
Chris Slootweg
Associate Professor at the Van’t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences
University of Amsterdam
Matteo Micheli
Senior Expert - Hydrogen and Power-to-X
German Energy Agency - dena
Compared with hydrogen and electricity, e-fuels have an advantage with transportation and storage. Thus, their very low energy efficiency becomes irrelevant when e-fuels are generated from power that is excessively and cheaply available and would be lost otherwise (such as in very remote places with lots of clean energy), and that can be much more easily transported to where it is needed. Although e-fuels burn much more cleanly than fossil fuels, only hydrogen and battery electric vehicles are totally 100 percent clean.

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